Our cheeses are currently being crafted and will be available soon. Please refer to our Facebook page for updates.

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Soft Goat

Chèvre translates simply to “goat” and is a centuries old name, coined by the early French goat herders. Soft cheese was believed to have been discovered by a young shepherd transporting his milk over his shoulder in a calf’s stomach. When he arrived at his destination, he discovered his milk had curldled into a delicious soft cheese.

Our Soft Goat is a fresh, delicate young goat cheese with a creamy, lactic sweetness balanced by a mild tang. Best enjoyed fresh, straight from the fridge. Perfect on crusty bread with smoked salmon and dolloped onto fresh fig tarts.

Wine suggestion: Chenin Blanc

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Herbaceous Goat

Throughout all parts of Europe, fresh cheese has been historically salted and soaked in oil to preserve its life.

Our Herbaceous Goat is a creamy, textured, slowly fermented cheese marinated in local olive oil with garlic and seasonal herbs. Terrific on pizza or chargrilled amongst roasted root vegetables.

Wine suggestion: Sparkling White

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Funky Goat

The “Crottin de Chavignol” name is linked to its name-sake village of Chavignol in the Loire Valley, France, where this style of cheese has been made since the 16th century.

Funky goat can be eaten at various stages of maturity. The young cheese has a subtle creamy, citrus flavor showing off the quality of the local goats milk. The body of the young cheese is solid and compact. As it ripens the texture becomes firmer with a slightly nutty flavour. Hints of blue mold may develop on the rind adding more complexity when the rind is consumed with the body of the cheese.

A perfect stand alone cheese for a cheese board, or use in salad or pasta dishes.

Wine suggestion: Riesling

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Little Goat

Made in the Besace style, the word “Besace” is French word for “purse”; used to describe the little sack that shepherds carried in ancient times. This purse was used to collect and form the curd into distinctly shaped cheeses. Today a mould is used to create the same outcome. Once the curds have drained, each cheese is dusted in ash to help with preservation and enhance the flavour. Left to ripen over a four week period, the slow maturation builds a thin rind of white mould, marbled with blue and grey.

Wine suggestion: Rosé

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Goat Tome

A Basque region style cheese, this semi hard cheese is made in the Chabrin style – silky, with a fudge like texture, the outside of the cheese has a natural rind that is cared for with a light brush during its four months of maturation. During the affinage (**ageing?) process, an extra dimension of texture develops throughout the cheese by the formation of crunchy knobs of crystallisation.

Wine suggestion: Gruner Veltliner

sheep

Sheep Tome

The origins of the oldest cheeses are prehistoric. This cheese is a Pyrenees ewes milk style cheese, now officially called Iraty, after the fern forests in the Basque region of France. The Pyrenees sheep herders insist that this cheese has been made since the beginning of time.

Sheep Tome is a seasonal naturally rinded cheese with a rich, moist ivory texture and mild nutty flavor. This cheese is a true reflection of the regions quality and directly reflects seasonal influences of the milk.

Wine suggestion: Pinot

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Velvet Sheep

A cylindrical shaped cheese, made in the methods originating from the St Affrique region in southern France where cylindrical stone buildings called “cazelles” were used to store hay and give shelter to the shepherds and their flocks.

This lactic cheese has a smooth fudge-like centre, with a faint straw aroma. The flavour is mild with earthy undertones.

Wine suggestion: Sangiovese

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Haloumi

Originating from Cyprus, during medieval times, the name Haloumi is derived from the word “Haluma” which means “to be mild”.

Our haloumi is an unripened, slightly springy, brined cheese which loses the saltiness when fried or grilled. This cheese is delicious grilled on the barbecue and served with a squeeze of lemon and some fresh black pepper.

Wine suggestion: Vermentino